Keynotes

We are pleased to announce that the following internationally renowned scholars have agreed to give a keynote talk during COSIT 2019 (in alphabetical order):

 


André Borrmann

Website: https://www.cms.bgu.tum.de/de/team/borrmann

Keynote:

Spatial reasoning for model-based design of buildings and infrastructure assets

There is a strong trend in the architecture, engineering and construction (AEC) industry to overcome the limitations of drawing-based working practices by the intense use of digital building models comprising all relevant geometric and semantic data. However, the potential for supporting design activities on a more abstract, qualitative level is still mostly untapped. The talk will discuss potential application areas as well as the challenges involved.

Bio:

André Borrmann is Full Professor for Computational Modeling and Simulation at the Technical University of Munich. His research interests cover the fields of Building information modeling, Geometric design and analysis, Design automation, Construction process simulation and Pedestrian Dynamics. He is actively promoting the construction industry’s shift towards the adoption of advanced digital technology and acts as advisor for the German government concerning the broad introduction of Building Information Modeling in public construction projects. Related to this, he is pushing forward the international standardization activities of buildingSMART, in particular in the infrastructure domain. He published more than 200 peer-reviewed papers and won several awards, among them the Best Paper Awards of the ASCE Journal of Computing in Civil Engineering in 2009, the European Conference on Product and Process Modeling (ECPPM) in 2010, and the International Conference on Computing in Civil and Building Engineering (ICCCBE) in 2014. Professor Borrmann acts as the Chair of the German Association of Computing in Civil Engineering (GACCE) and is Speaker of the TUM Center of Digital Methods for the Built Environment.

 


 

Sara Creem-Regehr

 

Website: https://psych.utah.edu/people/faculty/creem-regehr-sarah.php

Keynote:

Perception of Space in Augmented and Virtual Reality

The utility of augmented and virtual reality (AR and VR) for applications increases when humans perceive and act in the mediated (AR/VR) environment as they would in the real world, a concept that we call perceptual fidelity. My research uses a framework of body-based perception to examine both the information used in space perception and the measurement of perceptual fidelity. I will discuss current research on perception, action, and navigation that conveys both the opportunities and challenges with using VR and AR in spatial cognition research.

 

Bio:

Sarah Creem-Regehr is a Professor in the Psychology Department at the University of Utah. She also holds faculty appointments in the School of Computing and the Neuroscience program at the University of Utah. She received her M.A. and Ph.D. in Psychology from the University of Virginia. Her research examines how humans perceive, learn, and navigate spaces in natural, virtual, and visually impoverished environments. Her research takes an interdisciplinary approach, combining the study of space perception and spatial cognition with applications in visualization and virtual environments. Her work in computer graphics and virtual environments has contributed to solutions to improve the utility of virtual environment applications by studying human perception and performance. She co-authored the book Visual Perception from a Computer Graphics Perspective, and was previously Associate Editor for Psychonomic Bulletin & Review and Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance.

 

 

Daniel R. Montello

 

Website: https://geog.ucsb.edu/~montello/

Dinner Talk:

Twenty-Five Years of COSIT: A Brief and Tasty History

In this talk, I offer a few thoughts in celebration of COSIT '19, said to be the 25th anniversary of the Conference on Spatial Information Theory. I reminisce about some of the many interesting and entertaining people who have participated in COSIT over the years, and wax nostalgic over many of the incredible memories it has engendered, from Pisa to L’Aquila. Many fascinating and truly interdisciplinary explorations have occurred, and continue to occur, at this international meeting of the minds and bodies and symbol systems. I specifically touch on three of them: Cognitive Maps, Qualitative Reasoning, and Ontologies.

 

Bio:

Daniel R. Montello is Professor of Geography and Affiliated Professor of Psychological & Brain Sciences at the University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB), where he has been on the faculty since 1992.  His educational background is in environmental, cognitive, and developmental psychology.  His research is in the areas of spatial, environmental, and geographic perception, cognition, affect, and behavior.  Dan has authored or co-authored ~100 articles and chapters, and co-authored or edited 6 books, including the Handbook of Behavioral and Cognitive Geography (2018, Elgar Publishing); Space in Mind: Concepts for Spatial Learning and Education (2014, MIT Press) with Karl Grossner and Don Janelle; and An Introduction to Scientific Research Methods in Geography and Environmental Studies, 2nd ed. (2013, SAGE) with Paul C. Sutton.  He currently co-edits the academic journal Spatial Cognition and Computation.

 


 

Ruth Rosenholtz 

 

Website: http://persci.mit.edu/people/rosenholtz

Keynote: 

Human vision at a glance

Recent advances in human vision research have pointed toward a theory that unifies many aspects of vision relevant to information visualization. According to this theory, loss of information in peripheral vision determines performance on many visual tasks. This theory subsumes old concepts such as visual saliency, selective attention, and change blindness. It predicts the rich details we have access to at a glance. Furthermore, it provides insight into tasks not commonly studied in human vision, such as ability to comprehend connections in a graph, or to compare information across space.

 

Bio:

Ruth Rosenholtz is a Principal Research Scientist in MIT’s Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, and a member of CSAIL. She has a Ph.D. in EECS (Computer Vision) from UC Berkeley. She joined MIT in 2003 after 7 years at the Palo Alto Research Center (formerly Xerox PARC). Her work focusses on developing predictive models of human visual processing, including visual search, perceptual organization, visual clutter, and peripheral vision. In addition, her lab works on applying understanding of human vision to image fidelity (NASA Ames), and to design of user interfaces and information visualizations (Xerox PARC and MIT). She is a world expert in peripheral vision and its implications for how we think about vision, attention, and design.